Taking the Wheel

Category: Life & Society, Middle East, Women Topics: Women

Most women in America don't think twice about hopping in their cars and hitting the open road to run errands, pick the kids up from school or simply enjoy a long leisurely drive. However, in Saudi Arabia, women are still banned from driving despite several high profile incidents over the years that has thrust the global media's attention on the issue. This past week the issue was once again brought into the limelight as a female Saudi Arabian citizen took to the wheel and later posted the video on the popular social-networking site YouTube.

With her brother in the passenger seat, 32-year-old Manal al-Sharif, took a short spin that landed her in the slammer. The drive was deliberate as al-Sharif herself revealed in a recent interview in which she lamented her frustration for not being able to find a taxi one night, "I had to walk on the street for half an hour looking for a cab. I was harassed by every single car because it was late at night and I was walking alone. I kept calling my brother to pick me up, but his phone wasn't answering. I was crying in the street. A 32-year-old grown woman, a mother, crying like a kid because I couldn't find anyone to bring me home." Al-Sharif learned to drive in the United States and holds a driver's license from America. However, in her homeland, only men are issued driver's licenses.

According to Saudi Arabian authorities, al- Sharif broke several laws after she got behind the wheel including, "bypassing rules and regulations, driving a car within the city, enabling a journalist to interview her while driving a car, deliberately disseminating the incident to the media, incitement of Saudi women to drive cars, and turning public opinion against the regulations." Scores of Saudi citizens have rallied behind al-Sharif and begun to question the veracity of the driving ban on women especially when there is nothing on the books that legally bars a woman from driving.

Soon after her incarceration, a Facebook page was erected entitled 'We are all Manal al-Sharif: a call for solidarity with Saudi women's rights' The page has already garnered 19,000 likes. Another fan page related to the women's driving ban in Saudi Arabia is also getting a lot of support, to the tune of 6,000 likes so far, albeit for all of the wrong reasons. The page encourages Saudi Arabian men to beat their female relatives with a heavy brocaded rope known as the "Iqal", which adorns the Saudi Arabian men's headdress, should any of the women demand driving rights.

Al-Sharif remains in prison and her fate is yet to be determined. Some analysts have predicted she will stay in prison for five days, however it remains to be seen if she will face further penalties for deliberately flaunting the driving ban. Meanwhile, another Saudi Arabian woman copied al-Sharif's drive this week and was swiftly arrested at a local supermarket. However, she was only held for a few hours and released.

Source: The Muslim Observer - Sumayyah Meehanm


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  2 Comments   Comment

  1. H.A. from Yathrib

    How many of the drivers are women compared to the Men in Ramesh Chander's homeland, India? I don't think any women drive in India (those who do probably drive in their front yards).

    Do NOT sit in one culture and judge another culture? What works for may not work for them?

    The WEST/USA is NOT the world champion. Yeah its a self-declared world champion.

  2. Romesh Chander from USA

    Frankly, I love to be chauffered by a woman. In US, I have been on Greyhound busses whose drivers were women; I have been on local commuter busses whose drivers were women. Ane one time, even I caught a US Air flight whose copilot was a woman. Lots of my bosses were woman (some good, some bad). Some of my professors were women.

    Again, I love to be chauffered by a woman. I consider that as my manly prerogitive.

    Anybody disagrees.? If women can be teachers, why can't they be car / bus drivers and even truck drivers.?