Senior cleric questions women driving ban

Category: Life & Society, Middle East, Women Topics: Women Views: 2521

JEDDAH - A top Saudi cleric challenged a ban on women driving on Tuesday, saying women should be allowed more social participation in the puritanical Islamic state. Saudi Arabia is a monarchy ruled by Al Saud family in alliance with clerics from the strict Wahhabi school of Islam. Women must be covered from head to toe and are not allowed to drive. "Clerics have studied the issue and no one has come up with a (Koran) verse that would forbid female driving...," said Ahmad al-Ghamdi, head of the Mecca region's Commission for the Promotion of Virtue and Prevention of Vice.

"I do not consider it to be forbidden," he told journalists on the sidelines of a women's empowerment event in Jeddah. Women are subject to a male "guardianship" system which requires they show permission from their guardian -- father, brother or husband -- in order to travel or, sometimes, work. Religious police patrol the streets regularly to ensure gender segregation and that women are dressed modestly.

The rulers of the top oil exporter have wrestled with the issue of moderating the country's strict adherence to an austere version of Sunni Islam. King Abdullah, a reformist, has replaced hard-line clerics and officials with more liberal ones.

Ghamdi has been on the front-line of the conflict between liberals and conservatives. He published a paper last year questioning the legality of gender segregation only to be fired from his post. The decision was later reversed. In his latest remarks, he said however that fear of repercussions from hardliners was getting in the way of change. "There is a lot of trepidation in the society," he said.

"Even those who have a conviction about the importance of women's role in society are afraid of the harm and accusations that they may face and that is why a lot of people avoid opening that door."

Source: MSNBC


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  3 Comments   Comment

  1. Mariyah from USA

    Asalaamu alaikum:

    Pray tell brother who wishes that Muslimahs in the US should not drive, what would give you such a thought?

    Muslimahs in the US that cover CHOOSE to do so in spite if sometimes misdirected treatment and comment from non believers. We do not have our cleavage showing. If you suppress someone, the natural instinct is to rebel and not conform. Saudi women are not allowed that choice.

    Aisha (pbuh) led a battle on a camel of her own in the early days of Islam, isnt that the equivalent of driving a car?

    Insha'Allah in due time the veils will be lifted from the eyes of those who suppress others due to gender based biases and will learn the true Islam, that of the deen that elevates women and does not punish them for being born women. Someday all will stop burying others in the sands of fear and ingnorance.

  2. Ahmed M. from Egypt

    This article isn't about women drivers; it's about the extension of prohibitive measures into the personal life of other Muslims. Religious policing is an absurd tool because faith and dedication are taken out of the equation. People, especially women, are not allowed to discover the true meaning of submission for themselves and those who are meant to sin will sin regardless of government efforts. As long as man has control there will always be room for corruption and error; God is incorruptible and infallable. Women especially should have every opportunity to be tested because it is there character and morale that is passed down to our children. Sequestering them will only choke them underneath a sea of ignorance, dependence and apathy. Set our women free, but protect them from all about which God has warned us.

  3. Romesh Chander from USA

    If Saudis allow women to drive, where will it end? Soon, no veil, short dresses showing cleavages, open mixing of sexes in public, dancing, movies, etc. Saudi Arabia will become a carbon copy of London or Paris, etc. They are scared. So, Mullahs don't need any Koranic reason to deny women the right to drive; just fear will do the job. I think, muslim women should not be allowed to drive in US.