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Help with cooking terms

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ummziba View Drop Down
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    Posted: 10 August 2006 at 7:20am

Assalamu alaikum,

I was wondering if anyone might help me with these cooking terms.  I recently got an international cook book (I love trying new recipes), and I don't know what some of the terms mean.  I think most of these are Indian in origin (forgive me if I'm mistaken about that).

Flours: besan, maida and atta - what can be used as substitutes for these?

I know what garam masala is but what is chaat masala?

And what are these (and what, if anything could be substituted for them?): sago, sevian, asafoetida, mangetout, jaggery and galangal?

Any help would be appreciated - thanks!

Peace, ummziba.

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Angel View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Angel Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 August 2006 at 7:57am

I believe they are spices/herbs more so than cooking terms

Originally posted by ummziba ummziba wrote:

chaat masala?

And what are these (and what, if anything could be substituted for them?): sago, sevian, asafoetida, mangetout, jaggery and galangal?

say what ??

I've only heard of garam masala

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najamsahar View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote najamsahar Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 August 2006 at 8:14am

These are ingredients typically used in Indian/Pakistani/Arab dishes.

 

I can give you translations and what they mean but it would not help you as these are usually not found in an American grocery store.

 

If you can go to an Indian/Pakistani store in your area, If you live in GTA, you shouldnt have any problem or any of Canada for that matter. You will be able to find all of these, quite inexpensive too.

 

Write back if you need anything else.

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mariyah View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote mariyah Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 August 2006 at 9:32am

Asalaamu alaikum:

A search on Wikepedia came up with the following:

Chaat

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A young man at his chaat stand in Mussoorie, India. The main text on the front says "bhel puri" and "sev puri" in Hindi. In the plastic bag are puris for panipuri; the yellow substance is sev; the fried crackers are papdi; the white substance is puffed rice; and the other things are chopped onions, limes and tomatoes.
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A young man at his chaat stand in Mussoorie, India. The main text on the front says "bhel puri" and "sev puri" in Hindi. In the plastic bag are puris for panipuri; the yellow substance is sev; the fried crackers are papdi; the white substance is puffed rice; and the other things are chopped onions, limes and tomatoes.

Chaat is a word used across India and the rest of South Asia to refer to small plates of savory snacks, typically served at the side of the road from stalls or carts. Most chaat originated in North India, but they are now eaten across the country. Some believe that the chaat in Delhi is the best in the world, but other regions in India have their own styles, and would dispute that claim. Some are results of cultural syncretism - for instance, pao bhaji reflect a Portuguese influence, in the form of a bun, and bhel puri was created by a Gujarati migrant to Mumbai, whose descendants still run Vithal Bhelwala, near Victoria Terminus railway station.

In each major Indian city, there are popular chaathouses or dhabas, such as Mumbai's Chowpatty Beach and Bangalore's Hot Chips, and Gangotree.

Most chaat are based on fried dough, with various other ingredients. Popular types include bhel puri, dahi puri, panipuri, samosa, dahi vada, papdi chaat, and sev puri. Each is markedly different from the others in ingredients and form, but several common elements include dahi, or yogurt; chopped onions and coriander; sev (small dried yellow noodles); and chaat masala. This is a masala, or spice mix, typically consisting of amchoor (dried mango powder), cumin, black salt, coriander, dried ginger, salt, black pepper, and red pepper. The ingredients are combined and served on a small metal plate or a banana leaf, dried and formed into a bowl.

In countries outside of South Asia, even ones that have large South Asian populations, like the United States, chaat is rarer than in India. However, they can still be found, but generally in restaurants rather than on the street. In India, chaat generally cost between 5 and 15 rupees (roughly US$0.10-40), and in the United States, they cost between $1.50 and $5.00. Chai, or Indian tea, may be drunk with chaat, as may Limca, Thums Up, Frooti or other drinks; afterwards, paan (betel nut) may be chewed.

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najamsahar View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote najamsahar Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 August 2006 at 9:47am

Chaat is delicious. For all those who can tolerate a little spice and sourness, please have it once atleast!

Najamsahar

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ummziba View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ummziba Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 August 2006 at 12:50pm

Assalamu alaikum,

Thanks for the replies!  One of the greatest delights that results from the diversity of mankind is the lovely variety in our foods.  Alhamdulillah for all the wonderful varied foods from around the world!

Peace, ummziba.

Sticks and stones may break my bones, but your words...they break my soul ~
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote kathrine55 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 August 2018 at 2:25am
Hello ummziba,

      Chaat Masala is very important while you want to eat tangy food It is a mixture of spices  it gives lots of flavors basically it is used in salad,snacks.
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