Analogy of Zidane and the Muslim Ummah

Category: Faith & Spirituality, Life & Society Topics: Ummah (Community) Views: 29188
29188

I am not a soccer fan, but I was drawn to watch the last half of the World Cup match between Italy and France on Sunday, July 9. Part of the magnetic pull was Zinedine Zidane, a player whom I had read about briefly and whose profile seemed so unique that I sat down to watch him play his last game, a great soccer player who exemplified the best in sportsmanship, civility and citizenship. In my quest to understand the head-butt incident I ended up making an analogy between him and billion or so Muslims who subscribe to the same faith that he does.

Zidane, the son of Muslim Algerian immigrants to France, rose to prominence in the soccer world despite the many obstacles in his way. He came to be loved by the French, in fact, to be considered quintessentially French. He proudly bore the hopes and dreams of his nation on his shoulders, delivered well when he won the World Cup for France in 1998. He is often spoken of in terms of endearment, lovingly called Zissou by his French countrymen, respected by colleagues and opponents alike for his civility and restraint.

In this World Cup he brilliantly carried France all the way to the finals against Italy. This was to be his last match before retirement, and France was proudly holding its breath for a sendoff that would have honored his distinguished career as a soccer great. Instead, the world was shocked when towards the end of the game, Zidane, apparently after trading some words with another Italian player, turned, took two steps forward and head-butted him in the chest, sending him falling backwards to the ground.

I was shocked and alarmed. Shocked at his conduct in such a public space and alarmed at what the implications would be. I felt betrayed by this great man, who I never knew, yet whom I felt drawn to after reading about him. I immediately thought that he must have been provoked. Materazzi must have said something disgusting to make Zidane react in such a manner. At the same time, I felt that out of respect to his own self and his legacy, and to the millions of people who regard him in high esteem, he should have shown restraint, no matter how ugly the remarks were.

It was then that it occurred to me that what I had just witnessed was a microcosm of the Muslim Ummah, played out in a soccer field before the eyes of the whole world. For me Zidane was the Muslim Ummah, with past glory and achievement crowning his forehead, leading his people to victory, achievement and a respectable place among nations. His opponents were bent on striking him down, and one in particular, Materrazi was an embodiment of the monstrous powers who are bent on occupying, provoking and stereotyping the Muslim Ummah.

And like the Ummah today, the provocation was too much for him. He snapped and did something uncharacteristic because he felt victimized. Perhaps he was called a "dirty terrorist" as some report, or his sister or mother were called by some degrading name as others report. Whatever it was, he lost all sense of where he was, his legacy, his future and the difference he could have made to the game, and fell victim to the deliberate provocative assaults on his person.

I see his reaction as analogous to the protests, flag burnings and other emotional outbursts committed by Muslims against others who may have deliberately provoked them.

Like Zidane, we shock the world when we do things uncharacteristic of our faith, and we betray those who see in us a ray of hope for civilization.

Like Zidane, the Muslim Ummah has suffered provocations and deliberate attempts to tarnish its image, despite great civilizational achievements for a millennium. And like Zidane, we snap when we cannot take it any more.

Like Zidane's suffering of an alleged abuse, we also suffer the abuse of the desecration of our holy symbols, occupation of our lands, colonization, genocide and murder of innocent civilians. And like him, the temptation is to turn our back on history, our legacy of patience and restraint and to lash out without considering whether our actions are ethical or strategic. Kidnappings, bombing of innocent civilians, destruction of property after the cartoon episode are all images that have come to characterize the Ummah. 

As Zidane walked away from the field, past the trophy that could have been his, I thought: like him, will the Ummah get red-carded into oblivion, leaving behind a great legacy and squandering our opportunities to make a difference for humanity's future?

Farhad Khadim lives in Toronto, Canada and often gives lectures on topics related to Islam.


Zidane explains his actions: Read a translated transcript of the interview he gave to the TV channel Canal Plus in France about the incident.

Interviewer: You know the Italian players well because you played in Italy for five years. Did you have any problem with any of them beforehand?

Zinedine Zidane: Not at all. You always have friction with certain players...that is the game, it has always been like that. But I never had any clashes with anyone.

Interviewer: Nor Materazzi?

Zinedine Zidane: No, never. There was nothing beforehand and nothing in the match until he started pulling my jersey.

He grabbed my shirt and I told him to stop. I told him if he wanted I'd swap it with him at the end of the match.

That is when he said some very hard words, which were harder than gestures. He repeated them several times. It all happened very quickly and he spoke about things which hurt me deep down.

Interviewer: Everyone wants to know exactly what he said...

Zinedine Zidane: They were very serious things, very personal things.

Interviewer: About your mother and your sister?

Zinedine Zidane: Yes. They were very hard words. You hear them once and you try to move away.

But then you hear them twice, and then a third time... I am a man and some words are harder to hear than actions. I would rather have taken a blow to the face than hear that.

Interviewer: He said these things about your mother and sister two or three times?

Zinedine Zidane: Yes. I reacted and of course it is not a gesture you should do. I must say that strongly.

It was seen by two or three billion people watching on television and millions and millions of children.

It was an inexcusable gesture and to them, and the people in education whose job it is to show children what they should and shouldn't do, I want to apologise.

Interviewer: You apologise to them but do you really regret having done it?

Zinedine Zidane: I can't regret it because if I do it would be like admitting that he was right to say all that. And above all, it was not right.

We always talk about the reaction, and inevitably it must be punished. But if there is no provocation, there is no reaction.

First of all you have to say there is provocation, and the guilty one is the one who does the provoking. The response is to always punish the reaction, but if I react, something has happened.

Do you imagine that in a World Cup final like that, with just 10 minutes to go to the end of my career, I am going to do something like that because it gives me pleasure?

Interviewer: No of course not. But at the moment you exploded...

Zinedine Zidane: There was provocation, and it was very serious, that is all. My action was inexcusable but you have to punish the real culprit, and the real culprit is the one who provoked it. Voila.


  Category: Faith & Spirituality, Life & Society
  Topics: Ummah (Community)
Views: 29188

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Older Comments:
RAMZAM BIN MOHAMED FROM SINGAPORE said:
zidane is a player tat i wil always tel my son to be like a player he is. no matter how hard u tackle him, he just get up and move on wif the game. he is a sensational player tat i wil forever idolised in dis world.. but wat materrazi did say to zidane is, zidane is right to stand up for his family !!! in dis world we hav to respect every human and relegious weter they poor or anyting bad.. tats wat god ask all human being to beeeee :))))) gudluck best wishes.. i believe zidane shld be galatico manager.. he wil be greatest manager :))))
2010-04-12

CEZAYIRLI FROM FRANCE said:
hahaha , nice work , lol , ..well , personally as an algerian i saw his temper losing stuff as a vengeance against the nations that once occupied algeria , the land of his ancestors , he already walked on a saudi player in world cup 1998 , and this time he hit an italian and by extention we can say he hit france too , so here we get that he avenged us against the romans , the arabs , and the french , lol
2008-08-30

KASHEM FROM BANGLADESH said:
i am from bangladesh and i loved zidane as a footie player. and i really hate materazzie because of what he said to zidane about him,his mother and sister.
2006-08-30

MIRIAM FROM ENGLAND-FROM ALGERIA said:
i am also from algeria and i loved zidane as a footie player. and i really hate materazzie because of what he said to zidane about him,his mother and sister.
2006-08-19

YUNUSA HAMISU GABASAWA FROM NIGERIA said:
I really appreciate what actually happen and also this has made me to be one of the millions supporters of zidane.
2006-08-07

MOHD.SHAH HARON FROM MALAYSIA said:
Agreed to it and hope every body will understand.
2006-08-07

ZAHEERUDDIN AHMED FROM USA said:
To .. Mike... from Zaheeruddin Ahmed,

Rasulullah (SAW) said: "If someone hits you, you have the right to hit them back equally as hard but do not be among the trangressors. However, if you forgive then you would be better off, if you know.

That is how.

I hope I answered your question.
2006-07-29

QAISER ZAMAN FROM U.A.E. said:
Reaction of Provocation is rightful and justified.Any one else in his place must do that
2006-07-26

ISHAQ ADAMU FROM NIGERIA said:
Assalamu Alaikum,my Brothers and Sisters in Islam.Infact what happen with Zidane on that fateful,shows that,the so called western allegies,were against the development of any Black Africans.This is a challenge to all Africans playing in their mist.Be careful
2006-07-22

MOHAMED SHAH HARON FROM MALAYSIA said:
I would like to communicate with Zidane. Since the incident he has been well known among the Muslim youth. He can be an inspiration and motivating power for our Islamic youth in sports.I would like to contact him to outlined muslims sport in europe and around the world.

Wasalam and my best regards to him and family.
2006-07-21

AARIF BAIG FROM INDIA said:
i really appreciate your steps taken by u to inform people about what really happened,so that his act can be justified,but along with that i would like to know that to what extent zidane follow islam
2006-07-20

IRENA BINTI IDRIS FROM KUALA LUMPUR, MALAYSIA said:
HERE IS TO ZISSOU

YOU ARE STILL MY HERO NO MATTER WHAT... YOU ARE THE BEST!
2006-07-20

YOHANAH FROM MALAYSIA said:
Assalamualaikum wrbt.
No need for Zidane to apologise. For what ?

For the verbal insults on his mother and sister by some rotten Italian ? Infact all Muslims should stand up for him. If not because of those heinous cuts on him and his family he wouldn't have acted in that manner. He was provoked and there's limit to what a person can accept.

I agree with Brother Kris opinion. Who is the real terrorist here ? Is it not Italy that was the loyal partner of Hitler during the Second World War ? Is it not them who had been abetting Hitler's army in the massacre of millions of innocent lives ?

It is probably Metarazzi's grandparents or his great grandparents who shed millions of lives in their hands. They were the real terrorists.

Therefore Metarazzi should take a good look of himself and his history before stooping to the lowest level of calling names to others.
2006-07-20

AIJAZ FROM INDIA said:
Wish Zidane had regretted his action and apologised, then I would consider him a really great man and a good muslim in addition to being a great football player.
2006-07-19

ASMA AHMAD FROM PAKISTAN said:
What should be done is often enough contrasting to what actually IS done but that does not necessarily indicate it being a WRONG. the angle of deviation is mostly the measure where it leaves the bound of right to enter that of the wrong.
i strongly disagree to the opinion that Zidane's action potrays Muslims Ummah's situation, i agree there can be a similarity but to equate it altogether is simply unacceptable for me.
There is a lesson to be learnt in all this for everyone but a single man's action and that also in a sport field do not indicate an entire Ummah's Dilemma.
2006-07-19

MANAL FROM IRELAND said:
Being a young muslim in a foreign country, I can understand what zidane would have felt because no matter where a person goes, the moment they leave their own country, they are regarded as second-class citizens. |As the article does say that he was a person loved by all of France yet it is not surprising to know that despite this man's glorious achievements, his career comes to an end in disgrace. The people of france are only going to remember how his last match was and not of his past. It is a modern day example of exactly what is happening to the muslim ummah. Our achievemenents and knowledge is questioned upon until it is proved so by science hundreds of years later and therefore overshadowing us and making us look similar to what europe was in it the dark ages. I fully agree the point that the article is trying to make. Perhaps it is time we brought about changes not by b violence but by adopting these modern forms like the media. after all, two can play at this game too.
2006-07-19

KHISRAW FROM AFGHANISTAN said:
First it was just a game. Secondly you show quite sympathic with the so called Ummah. What do you mean by Ummah? Islamic terrorists? I think Ummah is nothing special but the projection of the clonialism period in the colonialized Islamic countries, like its similar concepts in other colonies.
2006-07-19

MANZOOR WANGNOO FROM INDIA said:
I Wish someone in France take Mr,Zidane to Tublegi Markaz to find out what is Islam?
2006-07-19

DOIN PHINE said:
Having played sports at a competitive level, I Know that goading is normal and to be expected.

The person goading, is doing it for one purpose, to throw the opponenet off their game. The person receiving knows the person is saying it to throw off their game. Somebody insulting your mother, sister or whatever, how can it bother you, you know why they are doing it. The only way to lose to this goading, is by getting mad. The way to beat the goading is by winning.

Zinedine, lost in so many ways in that game.

If I was Zinedine, I would FIRST of all apologise to my team, and then to my country.
2006-07-18

AHMED FROM US said:
This incident is nothing to do with muslim ummah. This is an Italian game tactic to win the game by any mean and they won it. Thatz a flaw in FIFA game. In this football game Zidane is not representing as a muslim, he is representing as french legend. Zidane personal life is different from muslim life. Muslim ummah's problems are totally different. The good part of this incident is, someone tried to break the ice, someone tried to start a debate against cunning behavior in games. I am not defending Zidane's action, personally what i think is, the way its relate with muslim ummah is not sensible to me.
In 1998, Zidane emerged a hero for guiding France to victory. Eight years later, Zidane again emerges as a hero, albeit for different reasons. This year Zidane did not hold the prestigious World Cup gold trophy, but then again, not all trophies are made of gold - some things are bigger then football....
2006-07-18

MAURICE FROM EL SALVADOR said:
Anybody would have Head-Butted another player If they would have had theri familly insulted numerous times. Once,even twice can be ignored but 3 provocations merits a strong reaction. Look at Lebanon now, The Zionists have been provoking Arabs for 100 years, yet they claim to be "The Victim". Many Latin-Americans (Sapnish Speakers" identify with our Arab Brothers and Sisters and we feel that it is necesary to deal with violent reactions towards the"Real Axis of Evil U.S, Britain, and Israel!!" Tolerance and patience are virtues , unfortunately, violent outbursts tend to get more results!! Peace, and Good Health, Maurice p.s I had been (cheering) rooting more for the Italians No Justice;NoPeace!!
2006-07-18

KASSIM FROM NIGERIA said:
Salam.Our example as Muslims is the Holy Prophet of Islam.What we should ask ourselves whenever we are faced with a decision is:What will the Prophet do in this circumstance?
In provocative situations,The Prophet was reported to have advised us that "La Taghdab" meaning "Do not get angry" We should not allow the provocation of others make us do what we are not supposed to do> The Prophet in his days was provoked many a time but held his peace and was never known to have been a violent person> May Allah guide and forgive ZIDANE and all Muslims> AMIN
2006-07-17

MEESUM FROM CANADA said:
ExcerptTheStar.ca
CATHAL KELLY

Now that the pop psychologists, kinesiologists and Italian lip readers have had three frenzied days to assess Zinedine Zidane's battering of Marco Materazzi, let's consider the incident calmly.

It wasn't "shameful" or "an ugly end to a great career" or "a shadow over the game" -- all descriptions used recently. It was understandable, excusable and, in a bizarre way, admirable.

We know the Italian started it. Materazzi has admitted to goading Zidane. And Materazzi is a man who knows how to get under someone's skin.

Much has been made of Zidane's famous temper -- the Saudi he stomped on in the 1998 World Cup, the 14 red cards over a 17-year career.

But whereas Zidane is a superstar with a mean streak, Materazzi is a journeyman known for little else. The Italian's two-footed horror tackles are legendary. He was once suspended for two months for cold-cocking a former teammate in a post-match tunnel brawl. He has been derided by his countrymen as an "animal" and booed the length of Italy.

Zidane could have waited for an opportunity to spike the lanky defender later in the game. He could have faked an injury the next time Materazzi brushed against him in the hopes of getting him sent off. That's what most of today's soccer stars would have done.

...It was inelegant. It was wrong. But it was a far sight more manly than a sneak attack or a kick in the privates. For me, watching infamous divers like Francesco Totti or Thierry Henry step up to give their post-match two cents about Zidane's "madness" was more nauseating than the attack itself.

Nothing that happened Sunday changed any of that....
http://www.thestar.com/NASApp/cs/ContentServer?pagename=thestar/Layout/Article_Type1&call_pageid=971358637177&c=Article&cid=115265461387
2006-07-17

ABDALLAH AL KAFF FROM SINGAPORE said:
Good ! well done !
2006-07-17

MANZ FROM INDIA said:
he done right
2006-07-17

IRFAN FROM INDIA said:
It is important for muslims to respect elders and to love children. But does that mean that anybody can pass any comment and muslim should not react.people dont condemn the person who provoked this issue but the person who reacted to it.ISNT IT HUMANE TO CONDEMN THE WHOLE ISSUE.
2006-07-17

TAJAMMUL FROM KUWAIT said:
Wow!Every one is upset for Zidane, why is it so? Let me ask some questions to the author, have you seen Zidane READING 5 Times a day? Have you seen him fasting in the BLESSED MONTH OF RAMADAN?.English lady for your kind information Islam means peace, its mistake of those who follow the religion that haven't understood the REAL MEANING OF HOLY WAR AGAINST CRUSADERS.Killing innocent people is an act of cowardness but never BLAME ISLAM.ISLAM IS THE BEST OF ALL!ALLAH THE POWERFUL
2006-07-17

ANUM ALI FROM PAKISTAN said:
No one is perfect ! Come on, when he was winning ,everything was perfect , no one considered muslim ummah in it, and now he did something ,which is quite natural regarding human nature.
How come he is representing whole ummah! no its totally unjustified to consider it that way!
any ordinary person can represent muslim ummah, which most of muslims don't consider it that way,neither they have respect for themselves nor for representation of islam.
its not that much wrong,just look it as a player playing his last match,anyone can get tensed in it.
2006-07-17

CURT OLSON FROM USA said:
I find that your article is very interesting, but I disagree with your interpretation of the events at the World Cup. I think of the head butting incident as simply a personal character flaw of an otherwise very talented athlete. I don't see it as an example of what is happening in the world today. But I know that Muslims everywhere in the world do not take responsibility for the actions of Mulsims or Muslim culture or Muslim governments. Every despicable action of a Muslim is due to Muslims being oppressed by someone else. This despite the fact that most of the oppression of Muslims throughout the world is commited by Muslims. The Muslim culture and world will not be taken sereiously until they make some big changes within their own minds, and a big start would be to accept blame and responisibity for ones own actions.
2006-07-16

JAY LIMMO FROM USA said:
Yes, that's exactly right. Muslims just SNAP.

And, just as in the game, Muslims decide that the rules of civilized conduct don't apply to THEM, only to everyone else.

And then they LOSE THE GAME.
2006-07-16

KRIS FROM MALAYSIA said:
Assalamualaikum wrbt and greetings to the rest.

I had earlier written my comments on this article and I am compel to add in more views to compliment the rest. I am a soccer fan, but I wrote this not because I am fanatic about Zidane or his roots and origin. What happened on the last World Cup was not just a game of football. It epitomises the views of some Westerners on Islam.

I considered myself as a moderate Muslim. I have friends of Christians and other faith since childhood and I even recalled of having a Jew as a friend in my school days. His dad was a doctor and despite our different faith, we learnt to respect one another in all aspects of life.

The issue here in the football Hall of shame as shown in the last World Cup final is certainly not a clash of civilisation. And I have no intention of painting Zidane as a hero. But it has it's significance.

The game could well be just soccer pure and simple but it didn't. Zidane was insulted and blasted with racist and cruel slurrs and poisonous remarks. His mother and sister were said to be terrorist whore. Can any Muslims tolerate such remark made against another Muslim ? What if the heinous cuts were levelled at other individuals of other faith ?

What that pure rotten and simple Italian said was an attack on all Muslims who believe in Islam and who subscribed to the brotherhood of the Islamic faith. Are we to stand by and watch this name calling and branding of our faith be degraded to the lowest level.

I am not surprised that a ..Italian would be capable of saying such low life remarks. After all Italy was the committed partner of Hitler's axis of the Second World War, in which millions were massacred and murdered. That boils down to the questions and it certainly points out to the answer on who the real terrorists were.

I urge Zidane and family to be patient in face of all these. But to those who were neutral and disagree with their views to think and think again.
2006-07-16

NEWMAN FROM LIBYA said:
Zidane is a great player, also a human being, we all make mistakes, it hurts when someone speaks bad things about your loved ones, specially your mum, I just would like to say to that English lady who said that it is very Islam, is that you seems to be very ignorant about Isalm to say so, Zidan you are a Gentelman and we all support you, you are a hero, if i had a chance i would have punshed that italian guy with you.
2006-07-16

MOHD. HUSSAIN FROM INDIA said:
The English Lady has brushed asside the incident as 'violence against a merely verbal insult'and has the audacity to call her self 'civilized' and also comments on the 'monkey like reactions'Yes, may be 'western civilization'has that lack of selfrespect and so teaches it's children accordingly, otherwise which self respecting individual would stand aside and watch his sister and mother being verbally raped by another and yet not react as Zindane did. May be the English Lady would love to romp around in a mini skirt exposing her cleavage and be auggled at and eventualy raped verbally, it is to prevent such insidents that Islam has women fully dressed from head to toe as apposed to the exposed and over exposed civilized west.Yes Zidane was hasty about it and should have waited for the game to be over before comfronting the Materazzi as he had a responsibility as a Captain of his team and a representative of his country. But football has seen teams beat each other, hit the referee and fans burn down stadiums for lesser cause then the Zidane incident.Do they not revert to their true nature... VERY VERY Civilized and Western. I nor condone nor condemn Zidane but in his boots and the spur of the moment I would react the same way...VERY Human
2006-07-16

YADAYADA FROM COUNTRY said:
So what was Zidane's reason for stomping on a fellow Saudi Muslim player in the 1998 World Cup? A Islamically-typical Sunni-Shiite feud carried over from the fractious days of Muhammad?
2006-07-16

AXEL FROM AUSTRALIA said:
It's human, this is what makes us human.
Some can show more restrain than others.
Most of soiety teaches restrain and it's not Islam alone, or a religion alone asking the same.
It depends how much pain one can take, how much humilitation one is able to endure and how much testosterone is flowing in your blood-stream.
Muslims worlwide surely have to endure a lot of humilation and pain. It is no wonder when especially young Muslim men snap and unleash violence, may do things they should not have, would not have done otherwise.
Bystanders are always quick with easy judgement, even and including Muslims. Stay united.
Wassalam, Axel MJ Cremer, Perth WA
2006-07-16

KRIS FROM MALAYSIA said:
Assalamualaikum wrbt.
I agree with what Zidane did. Yes, it's just a game but what traded of between that Italian player and him are not just games, it represents what some people in the West perceived about Islam.
No one should condone what that rotten Italian said about Zidane and his mother and sister, and those words are in direct reference on how they perceive Muslims today. Due to lack of time today, I'll write more via e-mail later. I urge Zidane and family to be patient, there's some hikmah ( blessing in disguise ) behind all these. Wassalam wrbt.

Your Brother in Islam,
Kris
2006-07-16

CD BARIC FROM CANADA said:
What a stupid analogy!

Using your analogy, we can expect to find some insulting conduct by somebody to justify the centuries of Islamic predation and aggression around the world.

Shall we look for fault with India for the murder of 60,000,000 Hindi? I guess the looting, raping, murder of non-combantants not to mention the enslaving of millions more are a result of some percieved slight?

Islam is about overthrowing infidel countries - the Qur'an is full of verses about murder and looting. It is amazing the Qur'an speaks at great length about HOW to trick, murder and destroy infidels (thats me for instance) and yet Muslims have the crust to try and justify their violence and treachery with ignorant analogies.

Let me try an analogy with you. Islam is like Facissm - not everybody that was a Nazi was a bloodthirsty murderer BUT a significant minority of Nazis caused unbelieveable atrocities in the name of their political party.

I remind everybody that Islam is more than a religion, it is a political religion because Islam is against the division of church and stae. Islam is also against democracy, freedom of expression, equality of other religions or women and supports treachery and violence to achieve it's goals.

Islam is NOT The Religion of Peace!

Bar
2006-07-16

SHERLON SMITH FROM USA said:
Look at the culprit. Of course he would like but, the message needed her ist that any Provocateur/bully/terriost/outlaw governments should will not be the one protected in this or any other national, local or international incident. White lies, White Papers, etc, becomes a coverup for many of the lies we are plagued with today because people's human rights are being violated systematically everyday. The provateur hides behind wounding words (i.e., throwing a brick but hiding your hand) is an example of the governmental deceptions and outright lawlessness plaguing the majority of the citizens of the world today. Zidane exemplifes a man who did the right thing under pressure, the culprit is the one who provoked it.
2006-07-15

MILITANT FROM USA said:
It is when we left the real Way of the Warrior that Muslims became subdued. This is merely the most disgusting and apologetic piece on the muslims. White folk do know that you do not insult the mother of a Black Man in the USA, while they curse and insult all the time theirs. ... Never liked watching 22 .. guys chasing a ball anyway, for I have better things to do.
2006-07-15

AC FROM UK said:
Good comment Mike Bro regarding Perzad Hakimpour's silly racial rant. If he and the Iranians thanked the Arabs every day until the day of judgement for bringing them out of shirk- the worship of man, idols and creatures like the hindus do- to the worhip of Allah (SWT) it would not be enough of a thank you.

Shame on you Perzad Hakimpour! You think the west is better? Humm-- You want to see racism and racial hatred and division, then come to the west- i.e Euro-America. I would gladly go live in the Middle East, but the problem is there are literally millions of non-Muslim Euro-Americans there who don't want to go home to good old Euro-America. They take up jobs we Muslims from Euro-America would easily do and do a billion times better.
2006-07-14

ENGLISH LADY FROM CANADA said:
legacy of patience and restraint, who are you trying to kid? Zidane is like the rapist who blames the mini- skirted, cleavage exposing girl, for his despicable behaviour and lack of control.. you try to excuse yourself by blaming the victim of assault for provoking.. bottom line you used violence against a merely verbal insult..Civilized people know "Sticks and stones can break my bones, but words will never hurt me"? and that's what we teach our children. Your reaction was no different than the monkey like reactions of the rioters after the Cartoon fiasco. reverting to your true nature..VERY Islam
2006-07-14

PRINCE FROM USA said:
Who is Zidane? You guys talk about him more than you would talk about Sahaba? Zidane is just a guy who runs around in shorts when sisters watch him. So, who is Zidane???
2006-07-14

DOIN PHINE said:
People who support what Zinedine Zidane, say alot about their chararcter. Zidane has apologised, and realise he made a mistake. I support Zidane, and what he has done after the incident. It is this that shows that he is both human and a great soccer player.
2006-07-14

JAVID FROM USA said:
Salaams
We should remember that it is a just game and has no consquence!!!!
InshaAllah, we are not trying to placate others, by backbiting our own brothers (which has many a consequence).
2006-07-14

SABRINA FROM MALAYSIA said:
Being patient has its limits.You cant be patient forever. The Italian fellow should not have only been head butted but stomped upon as well!!!
2006-07-14

OMAR BUKHARI FROM INIDA said:
IAccept the right to defend onself, but the reaction has performed by zidane was not correct as it was not the correct way to respond even proved by very bad or worse words or actions in islamic perspective (forgiveness is the advocated & special quality of muslim even in any kinds of provokation.
Thanks,
2006-07-14

IMRAN AHMAD KHAN FROM PAKISTAN said:
yes ,it was right reaction,absolutely right becuase it was personal comment to him and no body should be personal in sports.
2006-07-14

AHSAN FROM SINGAPORE said:
Farhad Khadim you gives lectures on topics related to Islam often, I pity those who attand your lectures. You may have the faith of a muslim but...... Allah is great, that's why he creat the "yaumul baas" to judge people like you and me, hope to see you there...
2006-07-14

AHMED H. FROM US said:
Your analogy seems ill-based, it was just a temper that most arabs have when it comes to the sport of soccer. I'm sure if someone else were in the same situation, they would have been inclined to do the same thing. To disrespect another's religion or family would be a blatant act of disdain and would be followed by the hope of causing the rash reaction Zidane committed that evening. If anything, Zidane could be seen as a sort of role model, for ultimately regardless of his dedication to France, his team, and his country he still protected his honor and the honor or what matters, Islam and his family, and simply showed that soccer is just a game. Zidane clearly does not represent a struggle or a revolution, the greatest wars we've endured are those of the Arab-israeli "Conflict" and such is based on land. When it came to the ugly rumors of Qur'ans finding their way into bathrooms or comic strips ridiculing our Prophet, Muslims acted accordingly and didn't answer with a "head-butt."
2006-07-14

FATIMA FROM USA said:
I am not sure where the author is going with this... Are Muslims to just accept the actions of those who oppress them? Or are we to ignore them and hope they will stop? We all can see that our Ummah is suffering. I don't think any rational person needs to be convinced of this. Yes, our brothers and sisters around the world often times do not execute the "appropriate" reactions to the blows they are dealt, but more often then not they do. Many live under oppressive regimes and struggle patiently on a daily basis. . An occasional "emotional outburst" may not be excusable but it is only expected. As a comfortable Canadian, the author may not relate well to them.
The author writes "Zidane walked away from the field, past the trophy that could have been his".
Dear Brother Khadim - We are not playing a game and the trophy (Quran and Sunnah) is already ours. So please, do not worry so much about what the "fans" think.
2006-07-14

REHMY FROM USA said:
Mike,

Thank you for telling the .. Perzad to take a hike. I swear these guys have had a grudge against Islam and Muslims for about 1300 years. It's like a bitter pill that they just can't seem to swallow. If they don't want to be Muslims fine. The Ummah needs quality not quantity. If these persians would like to hold on to their racial superiority view point, then they'll always be isolated from the Ummah.
2006-07-14

MIKE FROM USA said:
To .. Zaheeruddin Ahmed,
You said "We need to learn from the west a few valuable lessons. In a civil world, we don't respond to the brick with a stone or the brick, it is not fair and is unislamic"

Explain how is that wrong???
2006-07-14

REHMY FROM USA said:
The writer is a typical Muslim apologetic. For every action there is a reaction. This provocation continues because Muslims are powerless, or unwilling to put an end to it.In Zidane's case this was not the case. One headbutt and no more provocation. BRAVO ZIDANE! The Ummah could learn a thing or two from you.If there is no fear of the consequences or repercussions of the provocation, then naturally the provocation will continue or perhaps intensify.Take for example the recent provocations involving the desecration of the Holy Quran or the cartoons.If the Ummah had reacted more decisively than just some banner waving, lip service denunciations, and a short lived (but effective) boycott, then perhaps one would think twice before provoking Muslims. If the Muslim Ummah delivered it's own headbutt to the provacateurs, then perhaps we would see a much different dynamic between the West and Islam. You must demand respect, make them respect you. Any response must be measured but firm. Zidane didn't snap, he responded. If Zidane had snapped they would have needed and ambulance for that Italian player because he would not have been getting off the pitch under his own power. Responses to provocation can take many forms such as economic or military action, but whatever the case it must be firm and decisive with a united effort of the entire Ummah, or else the provocation will continue. It's just like dealing with a bully at the playground. Finally, I don't know why Islamicity would post articles by these Muslim apologetics. They are no good for the Ummah, with their defeatist mentality. Unfortunately this is the typical mindset of most Muslims I meet here in North America.
2006-07-14

MIKE FROM USA said:
JJ,
I live in San Francisco Bay Area. I was not born ysterday!!! I love your simplicity.
2006-07-14

MIKE FROM USA said:
Do not forget that Zain is a player not a prophet. Muslims can and have the right to respond that way as the Islamic Law and the culture allows. Why should he react like a Westerner? A westerner father for example gives a ride to his 18-year-old daughter to spend the night with a strange man and pick here up in the morning!!! May be this is Ok to the writer and his supporters!!!!
2006-07-14

TIN FROM INDONESIA said:
For Zidane
Whatever u did U'd be satisfied if u did it 4 Allah.
U are a moslem, so u have a duty to defend u'r great faith.
It's not important if the people all over the world will hate u. The most important is that ALLAH ALWAYS LOVE U.
KEEP FIGHTING
2006-07-14

MIKE FROM USA said:
To Hilal Shah,
You Said: "We as billions of illiterate, uncivilized, ill trained, individuals called Muslims have made the mockery out of the most beautiful way of life called ISLAM"
.....you are talking about yourself of course, I understand!!!
2006-07-14

MIKE FROM USA said:
To Perzad Hakimpour,
Take your racial hatred rubbish somewhere else. Arabs by the leaders of Saad Bin Abi Waqas tok you out of the worship of the creation to the worship of the One Creator. If you are not happy with that, tough luck. It is already done!!!
2006-07-14

A. M AHMAD FROM MALAYSIA said:
How can you say Zidane " was the Muslim ummah" when he has clearly stated that he is a non-practising Muslim?? Can a Muslim be non practising?
2006-07-14

RAUF FROM CDA said:
A shame that this greatest of greats is not as tall as the Italian foul mouth. I'd have loved to see him head-butt him on the nose(if he had indeed used the language he has been accused of)!
2006-07-14

MOMODOU L JALLOW FROM SWEDEN said:
I totally support his action although sad and out of character for him. To make a long story short, " walk a mile in a man's shoes before you judge him".
2006-07-14

SAAD FROM U.S.A. said:
BismiAllah Ar-Rahman Ar-Rahim

I feel that people put too much pressure on Zidane, especially because of his being Muslim. For me, Zidane's being Muslim creates sort of a point of commonality for me and as a result, I like to follow his football career. However, Zidane's being Muslim should not be a defining factor for him. He is a human-being and makes mistakes like the rest of us. I felt that his head-butt was an unfortunate action, but I still understand that he got very angry and lost his temper.

I agree with the author that the Muslim Ummah has enemies who seek to "tarnish" and harm it. However, I disagree with the author's suggestion and or question he posed as to whether the Ummah will "get red-carded into oblivion." The Ummah may appear to be fragmented and somewhat weak, but Allah (swt) will never let any harm come to it, InshaAllah.

Salaam.

2006-07-13

AHMED FROM USA said:
Well said Mike. You said it all just the way I saw it. I am sick and tired of all these apologetic so-called Muslim writers. Always gauging Islam and Muslims using Western standards. This guys calls himself a Muslim and has the nerve to talk about Islam and the Ummah, but never mentions anything from the Quran or the Sunnah. Some one needs to tell him to get a life.
2006-07-13

PERZAD HAKIMPOUR FROM IRAN said:
continuing ....

Islam obliterated the diversity of the peoples it sought to elevate, into the dregs of a hideous identity crisis by labelling it "un-islamic". The desert Arabs came and labelled us Iranians who were probably Avestans or otherwise "kafirs" robbing us of our identity. We in turn, robbed of our own identity did the same with a number of Central Asian tribes, and of the Balochs. Meanwhile Islam tore through the existing fabric of the remaining Central Asians and North Africans, etc spreading through the hands of the now identity robbed Turks, Mameluks and Syriacs. Whoever knows his history knows that the maraudig desert tribes of Makkah and Medina had little cultural development, they had fire in their swords and greed in their eyes when they pillaged and plundered the rich and prosperous Levant, when they laid to waste the advanced lifestyle of today's Jordan, Syria, Lebanon and Palentine ? Were they the 'Ummah' before th real Arabs plundered their homes and raped their women ?? I am sad to say that that is how our faith spread, through greed ..... and it is we who capitualated who must pay for it, by feeling that others are provoking us, suffering a persecution complex and fighting among ourselves. Until and unless we get back our lost societal fabrics no amount of implementation of Shariat is going to cure our troubles. Let us, the 'Ummah' first get back our identities which were obliterated under the banner of Islam, then rejuvenate ourselves. It is easy to blame others when the true onus lies with our decisions and actions.
2006-07-13

SAAD FROM U.S.A. said:
BismiAllah Ar-Rahman Ar-Rahim

Why does people put so much emphasis and pressure on Zidane? He is a Muslim, and as a Muslim myself, it kind of gives me a sort of bond with him. Therefore, I root for him and am a fan of his. However, his being Muslim should not be the very factor which defines Zidane.

The author's making a parallel between Zidane's head-butt and the Muslim Ummah is not well founded. Zidane is also a human-being and therefore, will make mistakes just like the rest of us. I feel that the head-butt was a bad moment for Zidane. We should just leave it at that, just as if any other player had done it, Muslim or non-Muslim.

I do agree with the author that the Muslim Ummah has enemies who want to "tarnish" and harm it. This is still very evident in the present-day.

However, I totally disagree with the author's suggestion and/or question about whether the Ummah will get "red-carded into oblivion." Despite any and all attempts made to harm and/or "tarnish" the Muslim Ummah, it will always be taken care of by Allah (swt).

Salaam.
2006-07-13

PERZAD HAKIMPOUR FROM IRAN said:
Mr. Khadim

I have spent time in quiet a few countries having significant muslim population, including India, Syria, Malaysia etc. except in India nowhere do we find the Muslim Ummah living among other non-muslim majorities in relative peace. I say this despite the recent dastardly attacks in the city of Bombay and the continued bloodshed in Kashmir. I agree with your viewpoint that muslims are being stereotyped, especially by the Westerners, but tell me something (I have been asked this question by muslims outside Iran and non-muslims elsewhere) ... why does a supposedly spiritual way of life called Islam differentiate between men as 'believers' and 'non-belivers' that too in the eyes of the Creator. A lot of things may be mistakenly being attributed to islamic texts, and are open to mis-readings, but can anyone deny that we are to blame for our troubles for our faith decrees that we are superior to others for we are the 'believers' and others who don't profess our faith are labelled 'kafirs'. The word 'kafir', is mentioned in islamic religious texts .... is it not ?? I have had the good fortune to read most of the important religious texts, and even eroded versions of those texts, do not contain such divisive ideas, be it the Torah, The Avesta, The Upanishads, or degraded versions of the Christian Bible (basically mostly taken from the Hebrew Bible). Muslim Ummah world over are different, in culture, beliefs, ways of life in everything.... how can you govern all under the shariat ?? and how can you dictate how a man relates to his Creator ?? It is an extremely personal things beyond the diktats of collective thought processes, and this isexactly where Islam's problem is: it is divisive, it subverts man relation with his Creator into the collective realm, it intrudes his privacy and jeopardizes his relation to fellow men. Whenever I read about historical conflicts in the realms of the Muslim Ummah, I find that Islam came and destroyed the existing social fabric
2006-07-13

CHARLES DOUGLAS WEHNER said:
Farhad Khadim's article comparing the behaviour of the footballer Zidane with the eminences of Islam is excellent. The words are well chosen, the message clearly stated.

It was never clearly stated that the Italians were playing a somewhat dirty match, sometimes tugging at the clothing of the opponents, and that Materazzi actually held Zidane back, by holding him by both arms - including the painful one that Zidane thought had been dislocated.

But what possessed Materazzi to use vulgar language? Was this also part of the Italian "tactic" of demoralising the opponent, or was it more personal?

Freemasons used the tactic of "Divide and Rule" in India, from the early 1700s onward. They INVENTED the "caste system", and imposed it on the Indians - as if it had always been that way. Today, we see Western Freemasons blowing up mosques in Iraq, and telling the Shia that it is the Sunnis doing it, and the Sunnis that it is the Shia. So today, in Iraq, there are "Shia areas" and "Sunni areas", as if it had always been that way.

Has Materazzi fallen for the anti-Muslim propaganda? There was no violence within Iraq until AFTER the invasion. Now we are told that the Allies invaded to STOP the violence. Does Materazzi really believe that all Muslims are terrorists?

We would all have preferred to see politics kept OUT of sport.

It is a shame that Zidane's career ended this way. He should have show a few minutes of patience - and could have revealed all to the press later on.

Charles Douglas Wehner
2006-07-13

JJ FROM USA said:
Mike,

You made some comments that may have come from ignorance.

1- Western culture, although free-minded and not strict has moral and ethical values similar to Islam. I have many American and know many American people, and the people that lack heart would let a comment about their mother or sister go without some sort of action. And I have known no American who lets comments about his/her mother, wife about Sexuality go over their head but their is also the opposite side to that (but none that I know).

2- In Muslims case, its the same thing, just a bit more organized (The mother is the held to be sacred; same thing in Italian cultures by the way). We know patience is the answer but we also know in certain cases, patience runs away. Flogging? No
2006-07-13

PRINCEOFSYRIA FROM USA said:
No, the Ummah will not and cannot get red carded to oblivion.
I liked your article, just that the difference between these analogies and implication is that Zinidane is a team player. Muslims are not. We criticise each other and have in this generation become our best and worst enemies. Until we unite like the team of france, we cannot expect to win the world cup of Shariah, and the shariah is not the one practiced in Arabia (Modern arabia). We talk and we cannot walk the walk. Zinidane did because he practiced his game and his frustrations were a little provoked and should not have been there and yes he should have practiced restraint, but sometimes things happen. As for our game, can we practice it right or are we going to nit-pick flaws on the other person? We know the problems, but we need to have the disciple and strenght to face the solutions.
2006-07-13

AHMET FROM FRANCE said:

C'mon, let's keep things accurate and in perspective.

1) Zindine says that he is a "non-practising muslim", so it becomes difficult to equate him to the Ummah.

2) The Ummah is not "a billion or so", Muslims number close to 2 Billion worldwide.


The path and the final end of the Ummah has been clearly communicated to us, so let's not waste time of meaningless analogies.

This was a poorly conceived and time wasting article.

2006-07-13

AC FROM UK said:
Good comments Mike bro! Could not have put it better myself!
The formula is simple:
Euro-Americans = CONSTANT sex on mind = pornography = okay for their mothers, sister, wives, daughters and girlfriends to walk around semi-naked and naked + sleep about. HACK! ALL THIS PART OF GREAT WESTERN/EUROPEAN CULTURE!
Christmas parties good example where fornication, adultery and sexual perversion comes to surface from dark closet OF 'CIVILISED WEST/NORTH.
You see MUCH ALCOHOL=LOSS OF INHIBITION = MUCH LUEDNESS + MUCH SEXUAL ACTIVITY + ORGIES + RAPING + GANG RAPING + BEATING OF BEST FRIEND(S) OUTSIDE OF BAR/PUB + THEN BEATING OF WIFE/DAUGHTER/GIRLFRIEND OUTSIDE BAR/PUB, THEN BARING PRIVATE PARTS BY ALL INVOLVED FOR ALL TO SEE, THEN COLLECTIVELY URINATING AND VOTIMIMG IN STREETS AROUND BAR/PUB.
SO TO EURO-AMERICANS THIS ACTIVIT IS SECOND NATURE. HACK! ALL THIS PART OF GREAT WESTERN/EUROPEAN CIVILISATION AND CULTURE!
I'm I surprised or should anyone be surprised that Materrazi said what he did? Hack NO! TO EURO-AMERICANS THIS ACTIVIT IS SECOND NATURE. HACK! ALL THIS PART OF GREAT WESTERN/EUROPEAN CIVILISATION AND CULTURE!
As for Zidane, I humbly admit he made a mistake! He should have head butted Materrazi in the mouth and made the b*****d swallow all his teeth.
TO HELL WITH THE WEST AND WHAT THEY THINK AS MY BRO MIKE SAYS!
2006-07-13

MUSLIM AMERICAN FROM USA said:
I understand where Br. Mike comes from. However, we should not forget that the main purpose of our deen is to show the world the path to true freedom and independence by becoming slaves of our Creator, Allah (SWT). By reacting like Zidaine we are working against what we have been instructed to do, spreading the truth, and are acting like the people who hide the truth, i.e. Kaffirs. Also, what the author writes about is really civility in the face of provokation. This is standard among all peoples whether they be Western or Muslim. Finally, I will leave Br. Mike with one last reminder so that I may benefit as well as he, insha'Allah. Our beloved Prophet (PBUH) is narrated to have said that the true strong Muslim is the one who shows restraint in the face of provocation (or something to that affect). I ask Allah's forgiveness if I may have written something in error or offended anyone.
2006-07-13

HILAL SHAH FROM USA said:
I agree with the writer not 100% but 200%. We as billions of illiterate, uncivilized, ill trained, ..individuals called Muslims have made the mockery out of the most beautiful way of life called ISLAM.
2006-07-13

SYED MUBARAK ALI FROM INDIA said:
Fahad, what you have mentioned is correct. The entire France people loved Zidane and wished him a good sendoff.Poor Matarazzi could have done anything else to snatch the FIFA cup from the French team. But he did a cheap thing by provoking Zidane by hurting using cheaper words. We should support Zidane at this moment of his career.
2006-07-13

KHAN FROM USA said:
ZIDANE was clealy targeted and provoked because he was an excellent player and Muslim. Of-course he should have been patient and reported to the referees immediately.

Italian players wanted him out of the game so they can win. They tried their best and succceded by injuring him, hurting him physically, mentally and verbally.....

He is in news everywhere, shown in the media, cartoons, video games and so on ..Why?, When some other players in different sports are worse than him.

People do not see what was the cause of such things, why it happened. They just provoke and do things that lead to such behavior that we do not see in the news.

We have develop patience and remember Prophet Muhammad's(pbuh) patience when he visited Taif, he and his sahabah were was tortured(physically, mentally and verbally), forgave many non-Muslims on different occassions for their actions.

O-Allah, Please give us patience, strength unity and give us victory..

2006-07-13

DR EDRISS FROM US said:


I careless about reading topics in this "islamic" website but sometimes I need get prayer's time from here. fortunatly, I came to read this gibberish he he he. let's me break it down to you in the right way that you can afford to understand? and I wish whoever filter the posts in this site, post this for you? if you have all this hate to Islam inside you and you wait for anything to happen so you can stab moslems in the back.

Some of the Aarabs(different than arabs and refer to the people who love just the benefits of this life and disconnect themselves from working to the hereafter: this kind of people were in time of the Prophet represented by country people no matter what religion they claim to follow)look upon their payments as a fine, and watch for disasters for you: on them be the disaster of evil: for Allah is He That heareth and knoweth (all things).

why tired yourself and call yourself moslem? go and have you enough wine, drugs and get you some hookers in LasVegas and enjoy being kiffer? don't be a loser in this life and the hereafter?


2:204 There is the type of man whose speech about this world's life May dazzle thee, and he calls Allah to witness about what is in his heart; yet is he the most contentious of enemies.


18:103-104 Say: "Shall we tell you of those who lose most in respect of their deeds? Those whose efforts have been wasted in this life, while they thought that they were acquiring good by their works?"

The hypocrites were always the sharp spear in the back of Islam.
2006-07-13

JAMES FROM USA said:
This is pathetic, Quran and Hadith both assures us that no body can Red Card us to oblivian, though we have short commings and we have to be polite but this article is on par with kufr. Who care what west thinks, I would have not sttoped at head butt.
2006-07-13

ZAHEERUDDIN AHMED FROM PAKISTAN said:
The author has made an extremely intelligent analogy. He has tried to teach the Muslim Ummah a great lesson hidden in a football game. The two reactions (Rizwana Oomer & Mike)are typical examples of the mentality of the Muslim ummah today. We tend to take situations emotionally and think afterwards and now we have gotten to such pathetic levels that we dont even think afterwards. We tend to justify even our faults, meaning even in the calm we feel it was right to react in the manner that Zisane did. We need to learn from the west a few valuable lessons. In a civil world, we don't respond to the brick with a stone or the brick, it is not fair and is unislamic. If prophet's (SAW) saying mean anything to us then we should remember that retaliating is permissible but we must not be among the transgressors. Now if we want Allah on our side then we've got to keep self restraint if we could get emotional and loose control then why do we fast to begin with? Remember, Allah would only help us if we are fulfilling his commandments. If we feel that we could take revenge on our own and perform justice of our own kinds without keeping the checks and balances and the guidelines provided to us by Allah (SWT) then fine, we can't expect Him to help us. When two parties dispute and neither is following Allah then obviously the stronger one survives, its only natural. The reason Muslims are humiliated in the world today is because we are not on Allah's side. It's true that neither is "West" but they are strong. If we need help from Allah then we must obey Allah and then expect him to help us. We can't have it both ways.
2006-07-13

AJEETH JALAL PASHA FROM INDIA said:
ASSALAMUVALAIKUM!
I agree it with Zinedine Zidane, saying "I want to apologise" for the sake of the childrens who watched the head butting to knock down Materazzi.

I also agree with Zidane saying "I can't regret it because if I do it would be like admitting that he was right to say all that. And above all, it was not right. "

No one is allowed to use bad words against one's mother/sister, if any one does it, he should be ready to hear the same about his mother/sister.

Zinedine Zidane is right in his action, because if we are in the same place of Zidane, we would have done more than this, if some one would have insulted, us before our team players,no matter how many of them watching it!

Mother is the most respectable among relations in our whole life, when ever some one tries to show it down, we should knock him down, no matter were or what we are doing.

Please do not relate it to the nation or religion,
i can see here only the relation of a son and a mother!

Zinedine Zidane is my HERO!
2006-07-13

AISHA FROM USA said:
Good Job Rizwana Ommer
2006-07-13

RIZWANA OOMER FROM USA said:
Who is going to red card the Ummah? If people do, who cares? Honestly, we answer to Allah(swt) don't we? Then what does it matter if nations (UN) etc., red card you?
What is this about the flag burning analogy the author made? Any event has a lot of possible outcomes. If somebody published those cartoons, then they should also expect the possibility that it will not be received well academically or in the real world physically. Then don't get surprised if demonstrations are not to your liking or the provocateur gets head-butted. Life is real, people are real. They have feelings and emotions. They have honor and respect. They have "ghairat".
As regards Zizou, please he is a human being. Why is everybody putting too much weight on his shoulders? He reacted the way in which any self-respecting, "ghairat" having man would. You call my mother and sister something nasty two and three times, this is what I do to you. That is the message. There is a certain line you do not cross. At that intense time the world cup, prestige, career do not mean anything. He did what he felt naturally right to do. Every discussion after the fact is purely academic. It may look wrong on TV and world stage, but I am sure in his heart he feels right! So that is all there is to it. And do not worry about the Ummah getting red-carded into oblivion, Allah will take care of his deen and its followers. Too many whiners and apologists anyways!

2006-07-13

MIKE FROM USA said:
The problem with the writer is that he wants Zain and the Muslim Ummah to respond to provocation according to Western code. Muslims do not have "Western Traditions". For example, a Westerner would see his mother sleeping with a neighbor or with a total stranger and that is OK, and if someone says something about his mother sleeping with someone, he would just smile or shrug his shoulder.
Muslims on the other hand have a different experience when it comes to mothers and sisters and sexuality. Any mention of a sexual behavior of a wife, mother, or a sister could mean death or flogging of the accused or flogging to the accuser. In Islam, to accuse one in their sexual behavior is a serious offence. It requires a serious response. I do not agree with the writer that offenders should walk away like that because "O it is just a word". If Zaid or anyone else go to the "extreme" according the Western Standard, they are doing what is normal under Islamic Law and culture. As Muslims, we should not call it "snappin". It is an expected response and the heck with the "Western" trophy. As to the Ummah, the heck with the West who is not going to recognize it as a "Civilized Ummah" the can be a "Good model" for us to follow". Why should the Ummah concern itself with the opinion of a pathetic group of people called "the West". Come on Farhad Khadim, stand up on your own feet and be a man.
Salam
2006-07-13